National Cycling Strategy

///National Cycling Strategy
National Cycling Strategy 2018-02-25T02:20:54+00:00

The National Cycling Strategy 2011-2016 sets out the objective to double cycling participation by Australians between 2011 and 2016.

In July 2014 the Australian Bicycle Council published a report that outlines the progress made on the National Cycling Strategy in 2013.

In this third year of the National Cycling Strategy 2011-16:

  • Australian states and territories invested $112.8 million in cycling related infrastructure, education and promotion.
  • Bicycles outsold cars for the 14th year running with almost 1.4 million bicycles sold.
  • National cycling participation rates decreased slightly from 2011.
  • Cycling is being integrated in broader transport planning and land use planning.
  • “20-Minute Neighbourhoods” are being developed to increase short trips and improve livability.
  • Bicycle facilities are increasingly being designed with separation from motor vehicles.
  • Street design and speed limits are being used to facilitate street purpose.
  • A “Safe Systems” approach is being adopted to improve bicycle safety

Read the Implementation Report HERE>>

NATIONAL CYCLING PARTICIPATION SURVEYS

The Australian Bicycle Council commissions a National Cycling Participation Survey which has been conducted in 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017. The survey provides estimates of cycling participation (measured in the past week, month and year) across Australia and for each state and territory.

KEY MESSAGES AND FINDINGS 2017:

  • 15.5% of the Australian population had ridden in the previous week, 21.8% had ridden in the previous month and 34.2% had ridden at least once in the previous year.
  • Participation rates are highest in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory.
  • Modest declines were seen in participation among children under 10 in particular, although this has only been observed between 2015 and 2017. The clearest trend appears to have been a steady decline in participation among adults aged 30 to 49; this trend has been fairly consistent over the four years and is statistically signficant.
  • Participation has decreased from 22.7% to 20.4% for males and from 13.7% to 10.7% for females. The declines over the past year are more substantial; from 46.8% of males in 2011 to 39.5% in 2017, and from 33.7% to 29.0% for females.
  • Of those who cycled in the past month, a much higher proportion did so for recreational purposes (80.6%) compared to those who cycled for transport purposes (30.7%).
  • Among those who had ridden in the past week, the average time ridden was 2.54 hours.

The Western Australian results of the 2017 National Cycling Participation survey can be viewed HERE>>. All reports can be downloaded from the Australian Bicycle Council website.

KEY MESSAGES AND FINDINGS 2015:

  • 17.4% of the Australian population had ridden in the previous week, 24.3% had ridden in the previous month and 36.3% had ridden at least once in the previous year.
  • Participation rates are highest in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory.
  • Young children have the highest levels of cycling participation: 49% of 2 to 9 year old children had ridden in the previous week, decreasing to 37% of 10 to 17 year olds.
  • Of those who cycled in the past month, a much higher proportion did so for recreational purposes (85.5%) compared to those who cycled for transport purposes (30.2%). This divide has increased since 2011 when fewer of those who cycled did so for recreational purposes (80.9%) and more did so for transport purposes (32.3%).
  • Males are more likely to participate in cycling than females with 22% of males and 13% of females having ridden in the past week.
  • Among those who had ridden in the past week, the average time ridden was 2.75 hours.
  • Around 54.3% of households have at least one bicycle in working order.

The Western Australian results of the 2015 National Cycling Participation survey can be viewed HERE>>.  All reports can be downloaded from the Australian Bicycle Council website.

KEY MESSAGES AND FINDINGS 2013:

  • 16.6% of the Australian population had ridden in the previous week and 37.4% had ridden at least once in the previous year.
  • 9.5% of the Australian adult population, aged 18 and over, had ridden in the previous week and 28.0% had ridden at least once in the previous year.
  • Young children have the highest levels of cycling participation: 44.4% of 2 to 9 year old children had ridden in the previous week, decreasing to 32.2% of 10 to 17 year olds.
  • 5.1% of Australian residents had ridden for transport purposes over the previous week compared with 14.1% for recreation or exercise.
  • Males are more likely to participate in cycling than females: 20.9% of males and 12.4% of females had ridden in the previous week.
  • Among those who had ridden in the past week the average number of days having ridden was 2.9 days.
  • The average Australian household has 1.47 bicycles in working

The results of the 2013 National Cycling Partipation Survey can be viewed HERE>>

KEY MESSAGE AND FINDINGS 2011:

  • Currently, 18% of Australians ride in a typical week (10% of adults), and 40% have done so in the previous year.
  • 63% of children aged 5-9 ride in a typical week.
  • 22% of males and 14% of females ride in a typical week.
  • Those who do not ride in any one week do so for an average of 3hr 24 mins over 5.4 trips (38 mins per average trip).
  • Cycling participation is much higher than typically reported.
  • Participation is greatest among children 5-9 years old.
  • Telephone sampling by interviewing one household member is very time/cost effecient and gives good population coverage.

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